February192011

Anonymous said: <p>I&#8217;m not sure if you have answered this before, but what are you studying in school? It seems like you would be studying something to do with human rights.</p>

loveyourchaos:

I’m in school to be a high school teacher.  I was a cultural studies major for three years and I really liked it, but I decided to change directions and perhaps get my masters instead of my undergrad in it.

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dianehaha:

jonathanpham:

Bon Iver and St. Vincent | Roslyn

I don’t know how many times I listen to this a day, but it gets better every time I stream through it.

(via keepittiffalicious)

(1,440 plays)

Download

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“Never dump a guy who makes you laugh AND cum. Get yourself a good job and support him. What are you gonna do? Dump him and marry someone who’s equally as boring and goal-oriented as you are? Please.” Anonymous (commenter responding to advice column discussing whether a younger girl should leave her 33-year old brilliant pothead-creative boyfriend) (via tan3000)
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madthoughts:

The sheer amount of noise Muse can make with just three dudes is amazing. I think tomorrow will be a Muse Monday while at work.

(Source: madthoughts)

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Focus is about saying no.” This quote is perhaps apocryphal but it’s credited to Steve Jobs. It’s not a novel idea. Many companies chant this mantra but do they really understand what focus implies?

Focus is the antithesis of portfolio theory. Portfolio theory is a great concept. Every pedestrian in New York City has experienced it. While the weather is fine, street vendors sell their regular wares, but when a rainstorm appears it seems everyone is selling umbrellas.

The idea that you keep umbrellas in stock seems very prudent. It’s a hedge that people will need a different product under different circumstances. Maintaining a product portfolio is a way of selecting a collection of products that has collectively lower risk than any individual product. The formulation of this even earned its creators the Nobel prize.

But “focus” is the willful rejection of this theory. By saying no to alternatives you increase risk disproportionally to the reward. If you have the means to maintain a portfolio it certainly seems imprudent not to do so.

So why would someone want to focus?

The answer is that too much diversification is dangerous. It’s dilutive to everything the company uses to create value: its resources, its processes and its priorities. It dulls the mind and tarnishes the brand.

So focus is not just saying no. It’s being supremely confident in what you say yes to. It’s having the ability to call the winners and the losers. A company that lives and breathes product gains this confidence. A company that puts markets or profit formulas first never obtains the confidence to focus, inflates its portfolio and thus risks everything.

Very well articulated piece on the value (and challenge) of focus in product development by Horace Dediu of Asymco (via tgoss)

(via abeshafi)

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“Average performers believe their errors were caused by factors outside their control: My opponent got lucky; the task was too hard; I just don’t have the natural ability for this. Top performers, by contrast, believe they are responsible for their errors.” How Do Excellent Performers Differ from the Average? - Farnam Street (via slantback)

(via abeshafi)

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“True strength lies in submission which permits one to dedicate his life, through devotion, to something beyond himself.” Henry Miller. (via mfs)

(via burmesejorjiapits)

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omegle:

You can’t run from me Voldemort!

omegle:

You can’t run from me Voldemort!

(Source: omegle1)

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